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Deer Hunting Scope

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 09:07
RifleDude View Drop Down
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I agree with that, given my eyesight and my preference toward keeping top end magnification at or below 10x for a general purpose BG hunting scope. I’m willing to accept some minor tradeoffs in absolute dim light performance in exchange for keeping my scoped rifles a little lighter, better balanced, and more streamlined. Light conditions and my chosen optics have never prevented me from taking a game animal I wanted during legal hunting hours.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 09:43
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Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:


But that's a sweeping generalization without qualifications, as it depends entirely on the amount of magnification increase, the optic's effective objective diameter, and the optical quality and coatings effectiveness.

I agree, I over-generalized.  I should also point out that my "low light" hunting is often after legal game hunting hours and is shooting at pigs and coyotes and other nocturnal beasts.  In that truly low light scenario, almost everything happens at the lowest mag setting possible.

Or with NV.

Although hunting pigs in an open field under moonlight is indeed fun, and scope choice becomes a big part of success or failure.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 09:51
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Originally posted by Rancid Coolaid Rancid Coolaid wrote:

Although hunting pigs in an open field under moonlight is indeed fun, and scope choice becomes a big part of success or failure.

There is still a big market for 8x56 German / Austrian scopes in Europe as wild boar are often shot under the moon and NV / Thermal sights aren't legal. (I have an 8x56 Swarovaski Kurz with illuminated No4 ret for this purpose)

Scrummy
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 10:02
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A good portion of my hunting time is spent doing that very activity — hogs and predators at night. I generally spend 40-50 days of every year hunting something with scoped rifles. Even under the lowest light, if I could use the scope at all, best conventional scope performance has never been at lowest magnification. For the past year, I’ve converted to thermal optics exclusively for my night hunting.

Run the numbers on the scope low light performance calculator at the link I posted and read the description of the terminology and calcs used. Then note how the data shows low light performance for a given scope progressively improves with increased magnification until continued magnification increase causes the scope’s exit pupil to become smaller than your dilated eye pupil.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 10:20
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Interesting you use a thermal sight. In the UK the serious fox shooters use a combination of thermal, NV and lamps. 

Some of the serious guys I know say "Find 'em with thermal, kill 'em with NV"

I would love a thermal spotter for deer hunting, especially in thick cover
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 11:06
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Originally posted by Scrumbag Scrumbag wrote:

Interesting you use a thermal sight. In the UK the serious fox shooters use a combination of thermal, NV and lamps. 

Some of the serious guys I know say "Find 'em with thermal, kill 'em with NV"

I would love a thermal spotter for deer hunting, especially in thick cover


The degree to which that is valid depends on how much one is willing to spend. The better thermal scopes (read “more expensive”) are a 1-optic solution for night hunting. I don’t use any other optic to supplement my thermal scope when hunting, but my real world effective range is confined to around 100 yards/meters or so. Resolution on the most recent gen of thermal scopes has improved markedly. To get into the truly good stuff, you can pretty much expect to spend at least $3500-$4000, although I’ve been really impressed with the resolution on my buddy’s new FLIR Thermosight PTS233, which is basically an improved version of the previous gen Armasight Predator 336. FLIR’s new “digital detail enhancement” tech is the real deal, and that scope can now be had for around $2k, which I think is the best value currently available for the performance it delivers.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 13:10
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 13:11
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 13:33
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10 years now that scopecalc.com has been online.

Good for that guy.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 14:22
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As much as I dislike admitting it, Ted is mostly right on this (he gets all giddy and happy when you tell him he is right, so I try to not do it too much Evil Smile).

In practical terms, all other things being equal, you get the best low light performance out of a scope when the exit pupil exceeds your eye pupil by 10-15% or so.

However, for a quick look (just a few seconds), you might get a touch more performance at a slightly higher magnification than that, but that quickly fades.

A couple of additional things to consider: if your eyes are properly dark adapted, looking through the scope all of a sudden delivers a fair bit more light than what you just adapted to, so your eye pupil will contract a little as you look through the scope, so if you are looking through the scope for a few seconds trying to make out what you see, bumping magnification up a little will often help.

During dusk, as your eye is slowly transitioning into mesopic vision, looking through a scope or a binocular can bump you back into photopic vision for a bit longer, which really helps.

ILya
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/07/2018 at 14:43
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 As I said in my first post, maybe I'm doing it wrong.

That, and perception is reality, so...


Carry on.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: June/08/2018 at 04:03
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Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Scrumbag Scrumbag wrote:

Interesting you use a thermal sight. In the UK the serious fox shooters use a combination of thermal, NV and lamps. 

Some of the serious guys I know say "Find 'em with thermal, kill 'em with NV"

I would love a thermal spotter for deer hunting, especially in thick cover


The degree to which that is valid depends on how much one is willing to spend. The better thermal scopes (read “more expensive”) are a 1-optic solution for night hunting. I don’t use any other optic to supplement my thermal scope when hunting, but my real world effective range is confined to around 100 yards/meters or so. Resolution on the most recent gen of thermal scopes has improved markedly. To get into the truly good stuff, you can pretty much expect to spend at least $3500-$4000, although I’ve been really impressed with the resolution on my buddy’s new FLIR Thermosight PTS233, which is basically an improved version of the previous gen Armasight Predator 336. FLIR’s new “digital detail enhancement” tech is the real deal, and that scope can now be had for around $2k, which I think is the best value currently available for the performance it delivers.

Ah, I think 100m and the size of a pig is a much bigger target than a fox at a bit further out

Scrummy
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