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***THE OFFICIAL OT WHISK(E)Y DRINKERS THREAD***

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RifleDude View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RifleDude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/06/2018 at 22:06
Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

We are looking for the distillery closest to Gordon Castle.


It looks to me like that may be Inchgower, which according to Google Maps, is located about 8 miles NE of Gordon Castle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scrumbag Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/07/2018 at 03:30
Some of the Sherry finishes can be a "little interesting". I suspect not the easiest thing to get right. Thought when it works is great

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kickboxer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/07/2018 at 03:59
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

For clarification on Lasanta, verbally, finishing and aging are the same thing... merely implies the movement of the product from one cask type to another... for extra "aging".  Sometimes called "maturing"...  merely taking on qualities imparted by the sherry to the wood of the cask. In most cases, it mellows the taste, adds new flavors the oak-bourbon casks are not capable of. 

I prefer the Lasanta of those mentioned, but overall, I prefer the original Glenmoranie Finished in Sherry Casks:

"A Glenmorangie finished in Sherry Casks that demonstrates clearly the effects finishing can have on a whisky. The distillery character is there but you can definitely taste the Oloroso. This is aged for a total of 12 years despite there being no age statement on the bottle."

At 19, in the US, one is considered "too young" to drink.  At 21 they are considered to have matured enough to drink.  In the whole process, they have still aged.


I'm not confused by the terms and didn't contradict any of that, Dan. I said it wasn't entirely matured in sherry, as your original statement about it would seem to imply. Of course finishing is aging, though the word "finishing," as per the meaning of the word, is a term used by the industry to mean a shorter duration of time in a specific cask type distinctly different from the original cask used for the majority of the aging, done at the end of the maturation period. I was merely pointing out that only 2 years of its 12 years of aging was spent in sherry casks; the remaining 10 in bourbon casks, that's all. This is important because it has a distinctly different taste than a whisky that has spent its entire maturation period in a sherry cask, as it still retains the characteristic vanilla notes that the bourbon casks impart to Glenmo Original.

The original Sherry Wood Finish Glenmo was discontinued and replaced by Lasanta sometime around 10 years ago as part of a rebranding campaign. Though some variation in taste over time isn't uncommon with most distilleries, Lasanta is supposedly the same thing as the old Glenmo Sherry Wood Finish, except with a different looking label, new sub-name, and an age statement added.

It is NOT the same...

Yes, if a scotch spends its entire aging process in sherry casks, it will be unique indeed, not common, generally above average... try Glenfarclas 17.  Then, if you feel really ambitious, try a 40 year old... it'll change your life.

So, Ted, in the last two years of your life... were you maturing or aging???

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BeltFed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/07/2018 at 09:11
Ted, Dan are yall gonna fight over scotch too? I suggest you two settle this like gentlemen and have a duel. Back to back armed with ten bottles of your favorite varieties of scotch, take ten paces, turn and match each other drink for drink. Last man standing wins.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RifleDude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/07/2018 at 09:20
Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

It is NOT the same...

OK, Dan, good to know. I'll take your word for it.

Perhaps you should take that up with Glenmorangie, as they disagree with you.


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

Yes, if a scotch spends its entire aging process in sherry casks, it will be unique indeed, not common, generally above average... try Glenfarclas 17.  Then, if you feel really ambitious, try a 40 year old... it'll change your life.

Other examples that are entirely sherry cask aged include, but are in no way limited to:

Some releases from Macallan 

Most, if not all of Highland Park

Some Kilchoman

Some Aberlour (namely A'bunadh)

Some Dalmore

Some Ardbeg

Some Buhhahabhain

Lasanta is not intended to be like the so-called "sherry bombs." Aging in sherry casks can often produce a very strong flavor. The goal for Lasanta was to maintain the basic signature flavor of Glenmo's house style with the sherry adding an enhancement, not overpowering the basic house style. It is essentially a "designer" version of their Original with an added sherry influence. 


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

So, Ted, in the last two years of your life... were you maturing or aging???


I'm not sure why a very benign comment of mine has triggered you to play the synonym game over minutiae. I thought I was very clear in what I said and why.

"Finishing" is indeed aging, albeit for an abbreviated period of time, and at the very end of the process. Aging isn't necessarily finishing, however. There is a very important distinction there. As the term is used in the whisky industry, they are most definitely not the same thing as you asserted. "Finishing" is a distinct term the industry uses, wholly separate from "aging" or "maturing." The Scotch whisky regulations are very specific in what terms the distilleries are allowed to use in their marketing for consumer protection. To be considered "aged in" or "matured in" whatever type of cask, legally, the whisky must reside in that cask for a minimum of 3 years. 



 




Edited by RifleDude - February/07/2018 at 09:26
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BeltFed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/07/2018 at 09:38
I've lived in south Looneyville most of my life. There used to be a bunch of large distilleries in south Looneyville along with a cooperage that is still there. It was not uncommon back when I was a kid to get the smells of the mash from the different distilleries, as well as the smell of burning oak as they charred the barrels at the cooperage. I had an aunt that lived on Southern Parkway on the east side of Churchill Downs, and the distilleries were on 7th Street, just west of Churchill downs. There the aroma of the mash was very different, and very pleasing. I can still remember some of those smells, even though I haven't smelled them in decades. All of those distilleries are gone now; moved to other parts of the state, or closed. Old Forester and Seagrams Seven, and maybe Old Crow were a few that I remember on 7th St. The smell of mash and aging bourbon was a unique experience.

The other morning, one of my captains rolled in, and asked what was burning. I took a quick whiff of the air, and told him it was the cooperage on the other side of the airport charring barrels, don't get excited, nothing's burning down.


Edited by BeltFed - February/07/2018 at 09:46
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RifleDude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/07/2018 at 13:04
Interestingly, Lynn, the Scotch whisky industry has a cooperative relationship with the American bourbon industry. For example, Glenmorangie buys oak trees in the Ozarks and has them coopered into casks. They then lease the barrels to Jack Daniels for however many years is required for aging their various whiskies. Then, Jack Daniels ships the barrels to Glenmo in Scotland. This relationship is perfect for both parties, as Jack Daniels is aged in charred new (not previously containing other spirits) oak barrels, and Glenmo ages their whiskies in ex-bourbon barrels. Both companies get what they need and it is a more resource efficient, cost effective use of the oak. Even though Jack Daniels is not technically considered a bourbon because they deviate from the bourbon process somewhat with their charcoal filtering, they do adhere to the same requirement of bourbons to age in new oak barrels.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sucker76 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 01:11
Jack Daniels cant legaly be called bourbon. That is why it's called Kentucky straight whisky.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scrumbag Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 03:26
Originally posted by sucker76 sucker76 wrote:

Jack Daniels cant legaly be called bourbon. That is why it's called Kentucky straight whisky.

And that's one of the politer things I've heard it called...
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I once knew a guy who drank Jack Daniels....you could smell it from 10 feet away!!     Big Grin
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Son of Ed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 04:57
Image result for hot glamour pussy with whisky


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scrumbag Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 05:06
Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

I once knew a guy who drank Jack Daniels....you could smell it from 10 feet away!!     Big Grin

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kickboxer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 05:16
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

It is NOT the same...

OK, Dan, good to know. I'll take your word for it.

Perhaps you should take that up with Glenmorangie, as they disagree with you.


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

Yes, if a scotch spends its entire aging process in sherry casks, it will be unique indeed, not common, generally above average... try Glenfarclas 17.  Then, if you feel really ambitious, try a 40 year old... it'll change your life.

Other examples that are entirely sherry cask aged include, but are in no way limited to:

Some releases from Macallan 

Most, if not all of Highland Park

Some Kilchoman

Some Aberlour (namely A'bunadh)

Some Dalmore

Some Ardbeg

Some Buhhahabhain

Lasanta is not intended to be like the so-called "sherry bombs." Aging in sherry casks can often produce a very strong flavor. The goal for Lasanta was to maintain the basic signature flavor of Glenmo's house style with the sherry adding an enhancement, not overpowering the basic house style. It is essentially a "designer" version of their Original with an added sherry influence. 


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

So, Ted, in the last two years of your life... were you maturing or aging???


I'm not sure why a very benign comment of mine has triggered you to play the synonym game over minutiae. I thought I was very clear in what I said and why.

"Finishing" is indeed aging, albeit for an abbreviated period of time, and at the very end of the process. Aging isn't necessarily finishing, however. There is a very important distinction there. As the term is used in the whisky industry, they are most definitely not the same thing as you asserted. "Finishing" is a distinct term the industry uses, wholly separate from "aging" or "maturing." The Scotch whisky regulations are very specific in what terms the distilleries are allowed to use in their marketing for consumer protection. To be considered "aged in" or "matured in" whatever type of cask, legally, the whisky must reside in that cask for a minimum of 3 years. 



 



Why so serious???

(it was a joke, Ted)

It is ALL still aging...

The Glenmorangie Distillery was officially licensed to produce whisky in 1843 (how long the distillery was unofficial is unknown to me). Glenmorangie, from the beginning, established a tradition of innovation beginning with the construction of tall gin styled stills which would be used to distill their whisky rather than the traditional shorter onion shaped stills in use at the time. They were also amongst the first distilleries to use American oak for maturing their whisky, and in the early 1990’s they were at the forefront of the new style of ‘extra matured’ whiskies which are finished (or perhaps we can say flavoured) by spending time in used wine barrels. (I suggest flavoured because these used wine barrels rarely impart any oak into the whisky, and the primary result of their use is to impart some of the previously held wine’s flavour into the whisky.) The core range of Glenmorangie includes three of these unique extra matured whiskies, the Sherry cask Finish Lasanta, which is a Sherry finished whisky, the Nector D’or, which has a Sauternes wine finish, and the Quinta Ruban, which has a Ruby Port Finish.

Recently the Lasanta received a bit of a make-over from the distillery. Previously the expression was branded Glenmorangie the Lasanta, and to produce the whisky the distillery began with a spirit very similar to their Glenmorangie Original (a ten-year old spirit matured in first and second fill bourbon barrels) which was finished or extra matured in Spanish Olorosso Sherry Casks. The new Glenmorangie the Sherry Cask Lasanta on the other hand carries a full 12 Year Old age statement in clear view, and this spirit is extra matured for the two final years in a combination of  Olorosso and PX Sherry Casks.

In 2014, Lasanta was lowered from 46% alcohol by volume (ABV) to 43%ABV.  My personal belief is that was done to mellow the initial taste and the finish... both of which could be a bit harsh.  It is smoother now, not so overbearing.  There are still a number of the pre-2014 bottles "out there". 

This is the bottle I have (that is not Lasanta)... no mention of Lasanta.  Purchased on a trip overseas and the lady who sold it said it was not exported.  But that was a while back... could be now.  There is no tannin taste, no alcohol "burn"... smooth, creamy, butterscotch, vanilla, juniper and honeysuckle.  A real treat.  It is not the same as the 46% or 43% Lasanta. 

Try the port wood finished, BTW. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Son of Ed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 05:36
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BeltFed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 06:55
Jack Daniels is NOT Kentucky whiskey! It is made in Tennessee and does not even taste like bourbon. It is good whiskey, but it is not bourbon, it is a Tennessee whiskey.

Ted your right about the bourbon barrels. Most bourbon barrels go to Scotland after they have been used, since they can't be reused for bourbon.

Many years ago, the distilleries used to sell the used barrels to whoever would buy them. Many of the locals would buy the barrels and sweat them, and get a decent amount of straight whiskey from the barrel. Of course a little bootlegging went on, but that was before my time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scrumbag Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 07:08
Yes lots of Bourbon barrels do get shipped to Scotland for Whisky making.

Speaking of wood finishes, one of my favourites is the 15 yo Glenlivet French Oak Reserve which is aged in Limousin white oak barrels. Tastes smooth, delicate and rather morish.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RifleDude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 09:08
Lynn, I always heard that to be considered a bourbon, it had to be made in Kentucky. Most bourbons are made in Kentucky. However despite commonly held belief, there is no legal requirement for a bourbon to be made in KY; they just have to be made in the US. Hudson Baby (NY) and Breckinridge (CO) are both classified as bourbons but aren’t made in KY.

According to Jack Daniels, it isn’t considered a bourbon because of their “special” charcoal filtering they do prior to filling into the barrels. There is nothing in the legal requirements for bourbon prohibiting this process, so technically, they could probably get away with calling their whiskey bourbon. Otherwise, they follow the “bourbon” making process verbatim. I suspect they’ve intentionally chosen to not use the bourbon label for marketing reasons so they can tout their unique charcoal filtering process, which they claim mellows their whiskey. In this way, they can claim they are unique among all other American whiskies.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BeltFed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 11:33
Originally posted by RifleDude<b> RifleDude wrote:

Lynn, I always heard that to be considered a bourbon, it had to be made in Kentucky. Most bourbons are made in Kentucky. However despite commonly held belief, there is no legal requirement for a bourbon to be made in KY
; they just have to be made in the US. Hudson Baby (NY) and Breckinridge (CO) are both classified as bourbons but aren’t made in KY.

According to Jack Daniels, it isn’t considered a bourbon because of their “special” charcoal filtering they do prior to filling into the barrels. There is nothing in the legal requirements for bourbon prohibiting this process, so technically, they could probably get away with calling their whiskey bourbon. Otherwise, they follow the “bourbon” making process verbatim. I suspect they’ve intentionally chosen to not use the bourbon label for marketing reasons so they can tout their unique charcoal filtering process, which they claim mellows their whiskey. In this way, they can claim they are unique among all other American whiskies.

Alas, you are right Ted. Jim Beam has plants in both Kentucky and Ohio, and for that I will only drink their Knob Creek bourbon if I ever drink a Jim Beam brand. By the way, Knob Creek is rather harsh IMO, and it will knock your Johnson in the dirt. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RifleDude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 11:50
You ever tried Eagle Rare (10 yr old), Lynn? It’s made by Buffalo Trace. It’s basically the standard BT house sauce with extra time in the barrel. Very good bourbon IMO. So far, I think it’s my favorite bourbon, but I like Buffalo Trace, Angel’s Envy, Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s, and Breckinridge almost as much.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote koshkin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 12:27
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

You ever tried Eagle Rare (10 yr old), Lynn? It’s made by Buffalo Trace. It’s basically the standard BT house sauce with extra time in the barrel. Very good bourbon IMO. So far, I think it’s my favorite bourbon, but I like Buffalo Trace, Angel’s Envy, Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s, and Breckinridge almost as much.


I really like Buffalo Trace and Breckenridge. Booker's almost as much. Angel's Envy did not write after with me for some reason when I tried it next to Buffalo Trace.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BeltFed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2018 at 12:59
Unfortunately no. However, Mrs. BF and I will be going to a nice steak house for our 30th, so I'll see if I can try a shot of the Rare Eagle.
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Happy Anniversary BF!
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Yes indeed, happy anniversary Lynn!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tahqua Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/09/2018 at 05:44
Happy Anniversary Lynn
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